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Wallis and Futuna Government 2019

SOURCE: 2019 CIA WORLD FACTBOOK AND OTHER SOURCES











Wallis and Futuna Government 2019
SOURCE: 2019 CIA WORLD FACTBOOK AND OTHER SOURCES


Page last updated on February 08, 2019

Country name:
conventional long form: Territory of the Wallis and Futuna Islands
conventional short form: Wallis and Futuna
local long form: Territoire des Iles Wallis et Futuna
local short form: Wallis et Futuna
former: Hoorn Islands is the former name of the Futuna Islands
etymology: Wallis Island is named after British Captain Samuel WALLIS who discovered it in 1767; Futuna is derived from the native word "futu," which is the name of the fish-poison tree found on the island

Dependency status:
overseas collectivity of France

Government type:
parliamentary democracy (Territorial Assembly); overseas collectivity of France

Capital:
name: Mata-Utu (on Ile Uvea)
geographic coordinates: 13 57 S, 171 56 W
time difference: UTC+12 (17 hours ahead of Washington, DC, during Standard Time)

Administrative divisions:
3 administrative precincts (circonscriptions, singular - circonscription) Alo, Sigave, Uvea

Independence:
none (overseas collectivity of France)

National holiday:
Bastille Day, 14 July (1789)

Constitution:
history: 4 October 1958 (French Constitution)
amendments: French constitution amendment procedures apply

Legal system:
French civil law

Citizenship:
see France

Suffrage:
18 years of age; universal
[see also: Suffrage country ranks ]

Executive branch:
chief of state: President Emmanuel MACRON (since 14 May 2017); represented by High Administrator Jean-Francis TREFFEL (since 6 February 2017)
head of government: President of the Territorial Assembly David VERGE (since 4 April 2017)
cabinet: Council of the Territory appointed by the high administrator on the advice of the Territorial Assembly
elections/appointments: French president elected by absolute majority popular vote in 2 rounds if needed for a 5-year term (eligible for a second term); high administrator appointed by the French president on the advice of the French Ministry of the Interior; the presidents of the Territorial Government and the Territorial Assembly elected by assembly members; 20 December Thierry Queffelec is appointed high administrator and will take office 7 January 2019
note: there are 3 traditional kings with limited powers

Legislative branch:
description: unicameral Territorial Assembly or Assemblee Territoriale (20 seats - Wallis 13, Futuna 7; members directly elected in multi-seat constituencies by party-list proportional representation vote to serve 5-year terms)
Wallis and Futuna indirectly elects 1 senator to the French Senate by an electoral college by absolute majority vote in 2 rounds if needed for a 6-year term, and 1 deputy directly elected to the French National Assembly by absolute majority vote for a 5-year term
elections: Territorial Assembly - last held on 26 March 2017 (next to be held in March 2022)
election results: Territorial Assembly - percent of vote by party - NA; seats by party - 2 members are elected from the list Fia gaue fakatahi kihe kaha'u e lelei and 1 each from 18 other lists; composition - men 14, women 6, percent of women 30%
French Senate - last held on 28 September 2014 (next to be held by September 2020) French National Assembly - last held on 11 June 2017 (next to be held in June 2022) French Senate - 1 seat: LR 1 French National Assembly - 1 seat: independent 1

Judicial branch:
highest courts: Court of Assizes or Cour d'Assizes (consists of 1 judge; court hears primarily serious criminal cases); note - appeals beyond the Court of Assizes are heard before the Court of Appeal or Cour d'Appel (in Noumea, New Caledonia)
judge selection and term of office: NA
subordinate courts: courts of first instance; labor court; note - justice generally administered under French law by the high administrator, but the 3 traditional kings administer customary law, and there is a magistrate in Mata-Utu

Political parties and leaders:
Left Radical Party or PRG [Sylvia PINEL] (formerly Radical Socialist Party or PRS and the Left Radical Movement or MRG)
Lua Kae Tahi (Giscardians)
Rally for Wallis and Futuna-The Republicans (Rassemblement pour Wallis and Futuna) or RPWF-LR [Clovis LOGOLOGOFOLAU]
Socialist Party or PS
Taumu'a Lelei [Soane Muni UHILA]
Union Pour la Democratie Francaise or UDF

International organization participation:
PIF (observer), SPC, UPU

Diplomatic representation in the US:
none (overseas collectivity of France)

Diplomatic representation from the US:
none (overseas collectivity of France)

Flag description:
unofficial, local flag has a red field with four white isosceles triangles in the middle, representing the three native kings of the islands and the French administrator; the apexes of the triangles are oriented inward and at right angles to each other; the flag of France, outlined in white on two sides, is in the upper hoist quadrant
note: the design is derived from an original red banner with a white cross pattee that was introduced in the 19th century by French missionaries; the flag of France is used for official occasions

National symbol(s):
red saltire (Saint Andrew's Cross) on a white square on a red field; national colors: red, white

National anthem:
note: as a territory of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)

NOTE: 1) The information regarding Wallis and Futuna on this page is re-published from the 2019 World Fact Book of the United States Central Intelligence Agency. No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Wallis and Futuna Government 2019 information contained here. All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Wallis and Futuna Government 2019 should be addressed to the CIA.
2) The rank that you see is the CIA reported rank, which may habe the following issues:
  a) They assign increasing rank number, alphabetically for countries with the same value of the ranked item, whereas we assign them the same rank.
  b) The CIA sometimes assignes counterintuitive ranks. For example, it assigns unemployment rates in increasing order, whereas we rank them in decreasing order






This page was last modified 08-Feb-19
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